May 17, 2018/Press Release

ICYMI: Mark Reardon and Politico’s Alex Isenstadt Discuss Republican Frustration with Hiding Hawley

COLUMBIA, Mo. — On the heels of a Politico report highlighting Republican frustration with Josh Hawley’s lifeless campaign, Politico reporter Alex Isenstadt joined St. Louis conservative radio host Mark Reardon to discuss what Missouri Republicans had to say about Hawley’s inaccessibility. As Reardon put it, “if a guy can’t have courage to come on in what would be deemed friendly territory to answer questions, why should people support that person for the U.S. Senate?”

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From the Mark Reardon Show:

[…]

ALEX ISENSTADT: One of the really interesting things is, in the process of reporting this story, was the number of people who were willing to speak very openly and very publicly about their concern that Hawley just isn’t running as aggressive a campaign as he should be running in that he’s not being accessible enough to people who are running influential county parties. He’s not being accessible to people like yourself, frankly. And look, this isn’t just me trying to flatter you. You’re an influential guy in St. Louis. You’ve got a listenership, you’ve got people listening to your show every single day and the fact that he hasn’t made himself accessible to your show recently, and as you’ve been supportive of him in the past, I think the fact that he hasn’t been accessible to you and others, I think, has really concerned a lot of people both here in Washington and in Missouri.

MARK REARDON: …I think that if they do Fox and Friends and national media before local media in the middle of a flipping U.S. Senate campaign, that’s a problem. I’ve had Claire McCaskill more on my show lately than Josh Hawley. So I think something’s not right there. If a guy can’t have courage to come on in what would be deemed friendly territory to answer questions, why should people support that person for the U.S. Senate?…

MARK REARDON: …I think one important aspect of this is he does not have any kind of relationship with Congresswoman Wagner. That’s important because she’s someone who can really heavily campaign for him, in particular with women. But they haven’t even sat down and met in the aftermath of these decisions to run for the U.S. Senate, which I think is stunning. I did not know that until I read that in your piece.

ALEX ISENSTADT: They haven’t met, they haven’t actually spoken, and he hasn’t asked her for her endorsement or her support and it’s just a remarkable thing. You take a look at Ann Wagner, she’s someone who’s been active in Missouri politics for two decades. Huge figure in the state, big figure in suburban St. Louis, and she could really help him out across the state.